4-Hour No Knead Beer Bread Recipe

Did you know you can make a crusty loaf of artisan bread in just a few hours? Read on to see how to make no-knead beer bread in under four hours!

No Knead Bread in under 4 hours!

5:11 am is the time that my darling angels woke up yesterday morning. They like to get their day started because who knows what they might be missing in the wee hours before sunrise? After recovering from the shock of beginning my day before dawn, I was ready to put on a happy face and make good use of my time.

First I made muffins, which I will feature next week. Then, after getting The Tall One off to school, I started bread dough. I am a big fan of no knead bread, having first tried the recipe that was popularized in the NY Times. I also tried “Almost No Knead Bread” from America’s Test Kitchen, which I liked even more, although it is a fussier recipe. Most recently, I found a recipe for Beer Bread that is the quickest and easiest method yet, and the bread is chewy, moist, and flavorful. I tweaked the recipe to shave 30 minutes off the prep time, and now I will share my version with you.First, put your choice of 12-oz. beer on the counter to start warming up (assuming it was in the refrigerator). On this occasion, I used Double Take Belgian White. It was our last one, and I was sad to use it for bread. Then I reminded myself that they do sell more at the store and felt OK about it. When you are ready to make bread, place the beer bottle or can in a measuring cup of hot water to warm it to a yeast-friendly temperature.

Beer for bread recipe

While your beer is warming, you can mix your dry ingredients. Stir together 2 cups all purpose flour, 2 cups bread flour, 1 tsp. highly active yeast, and 2 tsp. kosher salt. Now, pour in your warm beer and 1/4 cup of warm water (about 100 degrees F). Stir together until all flour is incorporated and you’ve made a lumpy, bumpy ball of dough as seen here:

IMG_7460

Cover the bowl with a towel and let rise in a warm spot for two hours, or until about doubled in size. I put mine on the dining table near a sunny window. (I like the way this Mommy figurine is holding a pacifier and ice cream cone. These are valuable tools in my parenting arsenal too.)

Let your beer bread rest and rise.

OK, so two hours have passed, and now your dough looks about like this. Bigger, right? I never know exactly how to be sure that it’s twice as big, but let’s just say it is.

IMG_7464

Turn your dough out onto a baking sheet lined with a silicone baking mat or parchment paper. Sprinkle enough flour (about 1 tbsp.) over the top of the dough to lightly coat the surface.

No knead beer bread after rising.

Now, shape the dough into a loaf shape. Cover with a towel again and let rise 30-60 minutes more (I usually go for longer). Before this resting period is over, place a pie dish filled with water on the bottom rack of your oven and preheat oven to 425 degrees F.

Starting to look like a loaf of bread.

After resting, cut a slash in the top of the loaf with a very sharp knife or razor blade. (I did not have a very sharp knife available, so my slash is a little janky. That’s OK. It still gets the job done.)

Slice your beer bread dough before baking.

Finally, bake your loaf in the preheated oven for 30-35 minutes until golden brown. Place on wire rack to cool completely before cutting. Just look at that. Yum.

Faster No Knead Bread

I will recommend this bread any time I write a recipe for soup or salad. It makes a pretty large loaf, so I also recommend having some buttery, soft brie available to spread on the leftovers.

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No Knead Bread in under 4 hours!

No Knead Beer Bread

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You can make a crusty loaf of no-knead beer bread in about four hours!

  • Total Time: 4 hours
  • Yield: 1 1x

Ingredients

Scale

Instructions

  1. Put your choice of 12-oz. beer on the counter to start warming up (assuming it was in the refrigerator). When you are ready to make bread, place the beer bottle or can in a measuring cup of hot water to warm it to a yeast-friendly temperature.
  2. While your beer is warming, stir together flours, yeast, and salt. Pour in your warm beer and 1/4 cup of warm water. Stir together until all flour is incorporated and you’ve made a lumpy, bumpy ball of dough.
  3. Cover the bowl with a towel and let rise in a warm spot for two hours, or until about doubled in size.
  4. After rising, turn your dough out onto a baking sheet lined with a silicone baking mat or parchment paper. Sprinkle enough flour (about 1 tbsp.) over the top of the dough to lightly coat the surface. Shape the dough into a loaf shape. Cover with a towel again and let rise 30-60 minutes more (I usually go for longer). Before this resting period is over, place a pie dish filled with water on the bottom rack of your oven and preheat oven to 425 degrees F.
  5. After resting, cut a slash in the top of the loaf with a very sharp knife or razor blade. Bake your loaf in the preheated oven for 30-35 minutes until golden brown. Place on wire rack to cool completely before cutting.
  • Author: Andi
  • Prep Time: 20
  • Passive Time: 180
  • Cook Time: 40

[wpurp-searchable-recipe]No Knead Beer Bread – You can make a crusty loaf of no-knead beer bread in about four hours! – all purpose flour, bread flour, highly active yeast, kosher salt, beer, warm water (about 100 degrees F), , Put your choice of 12-oz. beer on the counter to start warming up (assuming it was in the refrigerator). When you are ready to make bread, place the beer bottle or can in a measuring cup of hot water to warm it to a yeast-friendly temperature.; While your beer is warming, stir together flours, yeast, and salt. Pour in your warm beer and 1/4 cup of warm water. Stir together until all flour is incorporated and you’ve made a lumpy, bumpy ball of dough.; Cover the bowl with a towel and let rise in a warm spot for two hours, or until about doubled in size.; After rising, turn your dough out onto a baking sheet lined with a silicone baking mat or parchment paper. Sprinkle enough flour (about 1 tbsp.) over the top of the dough to lightly coat the surface. Shape the dough into a loaf shape. Cover with a towel again and let rise 30-60 minutes more (I usually go for longer). Before this resting period is over, place a pie dish filled with water on the bottom rack of your oven and preheat oven to 425 degrees F.; After resting, cut a slash in the top of the loaf with a very sharp knife or razor blade. Bake your loaf in the preheated oven for 30-35 minutes until golden brown. Place on wire rack to cool completely before cutting.; ; – – Breads – beer – bread – Andi Gleeson – [/wpurp-searchable-recipe]

Andi Gleeson, food blogger

Andi Gleeson

Andi Gleeson is a passionate blogger and mom based in San Francisco who focuses on easy and delicious dinner recipes.

5 comments

thor love and thunder streaming
2 years ago

Thank you for sharing indeed great looking !

Rosie
1 year ago

Hi, thor love and thunder streaming! Thanks! Have you tried cooking one of these? Which one, and how was it?

Janet Taylor-Cameron
6 years ago

I am wondering if one can put this dough in a regular loaf pan to bake … I would like a loaf that is taller. I am looking forward to making this bread! Unfortunately, the hot and humid weather is a deterrent to putting on the oven.
For me, it is all about the process and I love trying different recipes. Thank you very much.

Lea
7 years ago

Very nice bread! Is it better if you let it rise twice instead of once? As in you let it rise, put in the fridge and then when you want to cook it you take it out earlier to let it rise again? We used to do that with our bread back home, but it wasn’t beer bread.

Jacob
7 years ago

With most yeast bread, knead or no knead, it’s best to let it rise twice, especially after handling (moving it from the rising bowl to the baking sheet/loaf pan/etc.). Yeast needs a warm, stationary place to make it happy and do its business of creating all those nice air holes that make for good bread. By putting it in the refrigerator, you’re just putting that process on hold until the yeast is warm and happy again when you decide to take it out and bake it. We never did that, but what my grandmother would do was to bake all the bread she was planning on baking, then freeze the finished loaves. I’ve never done it the other way around as you said, but I know at least for me I always like to do everything in one and then eat it pretty soon too, haha!

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